George Miller, Sr., and his brother Bill pose for a photograph with their mother, Nora,

George Miller, Sr., and his brother Bill pose for a photograph with their mother, Nora, a century or so ago. George bought 140 acres of worn-out farm land and rehabilitated it into a family farm operation that still thrives. – SUBMITTED

Alex Miller can frame his story as if it were a fairytale. A farm boy meets his sweetheart in high school, goes to the land grant state university dead-set on returning there as a faculty member so he can farm and teach, builds a home on the spot of land where he courted that sweetheart and they raise a family there.

Those components, along with the fact their family farm reached Century Farm status in August, would be plenty of reasons to schedule a shindig. But there are other elements – the burgeoning success of Lick Skillet Farm, a 60-acre farm within the farm enterprise, notable innovations and continual growth that has kept the land viable since George A. Miller, Sr. rescued it in 1919 – that call for a party. In fact, two parties – one designed especially for families, and a dinner celebration – are slated for Saturday, October 19.

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